In the Sybase vs Oracle discussion there is always one issue that Oracle used to win. Row level locking. In the early days of Sybase, page level locking was the lowest level of granularity that locks attained. Much of this was due to a conscious choice of increasing the performance of the transaction, rather than ensuring unique row locking in Sybase. After row level locking was added to Sybase at version 11, this was proved to be a false ‘feature’ as most Sybase installations rarely implemented it.

In retrospect most issues relating to row level being a requirement can be traced back to badly implemented transaction clients. which makes this even more evident, is that in many cases, when the client transaction were ‘repaired’ to implement true ACID transactions, the Oracle databases performed better, and the row level locking issues vanished as a requirement.

UPDATE:

One other difference between Oracle and Sybase which doesn’t get much visibility is the business of isolation levels. Oracle allows the ‘dirty’ read and Sybase does not. This is changeable in both databases, but Oracle used this to their advantage in the locking wars as shared, and shared intent locking did not cause the same kind of issues like the ones you would encounter in Sybase.

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